Judge Threatened With Removal From the Bench for Her Religious Beliefs

GeorgiaLeeLang057Pinedale, Wyoming is a town with a population of just over 2,000 people. It is considered a gateway to the more famous Jackson Hole and sits surrounded by over 1,300 lakes. In such a small town everyone knows everyone else, and their local judge is beloved by all.

Her name is Ruth Neely and her career is in jeopardy after she gave an interview to a local newspaper admitting that her religious beliefs would prevent her from officiating at a same-sex marriage, an interview she gave shortly after Wyoming legalized same-sex marriage in 2014.

Mind you, Judge Neely is a municipal judge and circuit court magistrate whose cases involve traffic offences, bylaw breaches, and the like. Her judicial role does not include performing marriages of any kind, and she has never been asked to perform a same-sex marriage.

Nonetheless, the Wyoming Commission on Judicial Conduct and Ethics is seeking to remove her from her position and wants her to pay $40,000 in fines as well, because they allege her media comments manifest a bias and make her unfit to be a judge.

The Casper Star Tribune reported that the Wyoming Commission told Judge Neely  they would drop their prosecution of her if she would resign, admit wrongdoing, and never again seek a judicial position in Wyoming. Later the Commission suggested she could stay on, but only if she publicly apologized, and agreed to perform same-sex marriages. Judge Neely declined their offers and is now fighting to maintain her religious convictions.

Judge Neely’s dilemma has engendered a groundswell of support, including from members of the local LGBT community.  An oft-repeated sentiment is that “it would be obscene and offensive to discipline Judge Neely for her religious beliefs about marriage.”

The Commission’s persecution of Judge Neely is particularly egregious as they admit she has served the community well for twenty years,  and is a well-recognized and well-respected judge.

The Becket Fund for Religious Liberty, a non-profit advocacy group based in Washington, D. C. have come to Judge Neely’s aid. Their mission is to “protect the free expression of all religious traditions. Their clients have included Buddhists, Christians, Hindus, Jews, Muslims, Sikhs, and Zoroastrians.

Lawyers from the Becket Fund filed a brief on the judge’s behalf which declared “This would be the first time in the country that a judge was removed from office because of her religious beliefs about marriage.”

It seems wrongheaded to oust a judge for her religious views when those views do not interfere with her judicial duties. There is something very strange going on here.

Lawdiva aka Georgialee Lang

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BC Judge Allows 11-Year Old Girl to Continue Treatment to Transition to a Boy

GeorgiaLeeLang025A British Columbia  Supreme Court judge has appointed a lawyer for an 11-year old Prince George girl who is undergoing hormonal treatment to transition to a boy, a process encouraged by the girl’s mother, but opposed by her father. The child’s parents are separated.

Children diagnosed with gender dysphoria are no longer staying in the shadows, as we read about child gender transitions around the world, including the United Kingdom and Australia. Below is an article I wrote in January 2011 entitled “Children Born in the Wrong Body”.

A Family Court Judge in Australia has approved sexual reassignment surgery for a 16 year-old schoolboy who suffers from a mild form of autism. Justice Linda Dessau heard evidence of the boy’s desperation to escape his gender prison and start his life over as a girl. The Court listened to testimony of significant distress, anxiety and depression, including at least one suicide attempt.

The boy’s family, six specialists and his independent lawyer all confirmed the boy’s maturity to make this life-changing decision. The Court also heard that the boy’s father enjoyed dressing in female attire while he was a young man, but had abandoned this practice as he matured.

The protocol for sexual reassignment treatment of children is to give them hormonal drugs which arrests their journey into puberty, thus delaying the development of breasts in girls and the growth of hair and a deeper voice in boys.

Experts believe this initial treatment gives a child the opportunity to decide if they wish to move forward with further hormonal treatment and later surgery. In this case the Court also ordered that the boy’s sperm be collected and stored in the event the female hormones impeded his ability to have children.

Sex change surgery is highly controversial, particularly for children, but it is not without precedent. Six years ago an Australian Court’s decision to permit a 12 year-old girl to begin hormonal treatment was met by public anger. At the age of 17 the Court also approved a double mastectomy as the girl moved through her reassignment treatment.

While it is reported that most people who complete the surgery are happy with their new lives, for others the surgery is anything but positive. The director of Australia’s only sex change clinic has been under fire for several years as a result of former patients suing her, the Clinic, and the Clinic’s other doctors, alleging negligence and errors in diagnosis.

After allegations were made in 2009, psychiatrist Dr. Trudy Kennedy of the Monash Gender Dysphoria Clinic in Melbourne, was forced to close the clinic for a time. It is reported that eight former patients have complaints against Dr. Kennedy and three lawsuits have been commenced.

One former patient who had surgery when he was 21, maintains that he was misdiagnosed as a transexual by Dr. Kennedy. He underwent surgery to reverse the original procedure and says he now lives as a “mutilated freak”. He received a damage award.

Another 66 year-old man settled out-of-court. He had been sexually abused by his mother for seven years and received the sex change surgery in Dr. Kennedy’s Clinic, despite an opinion from a psychiatrist that the surgery would not help him.

Dr. Kennedy believes that the desire to change gender is biologically based and thus, surgery is the only cure. Other experts say that child abuse and psychiatric ailments may cause gender confusion, which should be treated with psychotherapy, not surgery.

Transexualism is generally misunderstood and public education is lacking. Vancouver human rights lawyer barbara findlay Q.C. remarks:

“Transgendered people-both transexuals who are born in
the wrong body and other people who identify as neither,
or both, male and/or female, continue to suffer
horrendous discrimination.”

Lawdiva aka Georgialee Lang

Scam Doctors Exposed and Arrested

Why would a person pretend to be a doctor: see patients, prescribe medicine, and collect co-payments… and how do they think they can get away with it? No, I’m not referring to the well-known collection of quacks that practice medicine in Nigeria, or the so-called cosmetic rejuvenation “professionals” who pump silicon into unsuspecting patients, but those individuals who set up practices and hold themselves out to be medical professionals.

The latest scam doctor is an 18-year-old boy, Malachi Love-Robinson from West Palm Beach, Florida who acquired space in a local medical building, calls himself Dr. Love-Robinson, indicates he holds a PhD, and other certifications, and recently opened his clinic “New Birth New Life Medical Center and Urgent Care, LLC”. According to website healthgrades.com, Dr. Love-Robinson specializes in naturopathy, psychology, and mental health, and is 25-years-old.

His website “http://www.nbnlmedicalcenter.com touts him as a well-rounded professional who utilizes physiological, psychological, and mechanical methods, such as air, water, heat, light, earth, phototherapy, electrotherapy, physiotherapy, mechanotherapy, naturopathic corrections and manipulations, and natural methods or modalities, together with natural medicines, natural processed food, and herbs and nature’s remedies.

Lending credibility to his practice, he displays the name and photo of his Operations Director, Michelle L. Newsome, who he candidly admits is a faith-based, happily married grandmother with limited experience in the medical field. Dr. Sandra J. White is his Program Director. She worked with a HIV/AIDS organization and holds an honorary Doctorate in Divinity.

After treating an undercover member of the West Palm Beach Sheriff’s Department Love-Robinson was charged with two counts of practicing medicine without a license, one count of grand theft, and four counts of fraud. One of his alleged victims was an elderly woman who paid $3,500 for a stomach treatment.

Love-Robinson’s clinic is no clandestine, underground medical facility, which suggests that he naively believes he can legitimately treat patients with his holistic, spiritual brand of medicine. He even fooled his grandfather who reportedly said, “Once he opened up the office and the practice I felt like it was something legit that he’s trying to do.” Unfortunately for patients desperate for health care, there are individuals with no credentials who will take money and provide treatments that have no scientific foundation.

Donald Lee-Edwards, age 43, from Staten Island, is another flagrant example of fraudulent medicine. The self-professed clinical psychologist and medical doctor treated over 100 patients from his basement suite office over a three-year period before he was arrested for multiple counts of fraud, impersonation, distributing controlled substances, and other related charges. His office looked like the real thing with a waiting room with a seating area, a front desk and treatment rooms. On the shelves were blood vials, urine samples, and medical equipment. He was a former flight attendant and eyebrow threader who had no medical training or credentials.

His scam was exposed in 2015 when patients became concerned that he was sharing personal information about his patients to others, prescribing drugs under another doctor’s name, and generally conducting himself in a way that was far from professional. He even had a Yellow Pages ad marketing his services.

Perhaps the most notorious fraudster, who pretended to be a pilot, a lawyer, and a doctor is Frank Abagnale, the subject of a book and movie called “Catch Me if You Can”. Mr. Abagnale impersonated these professionals when he was in his late teens and early 20’s, spent five years of a 12-year sentence in prison, in various jurisdictions, and later turned his life around, admitting that his earlier pranks were immoral, unethical, illegal, and dangerous to the public. He was later hired by the FBI as an expert on forgery and document theft.

As consumers of medical services, a person can never be too careful. All may not be what it seems.

Lawdiva aka Georgialee Lang

 

 

 

Mother Forces 14-Year-Old Adopted Daughter to Become Surrogate

“Wicked” is how a judge described an American woman living in Britain, who enlisted her 14-year-old adopted daughter as her surrogate, so she could have a fourth child.

The unnamed woman and her husband adopted two children from overseas and later after the coupled divorced, she adopted a third child.

She then wished to adopt a fourth child, but her application to an international adoption agency was rejected leading her to initiate Plan B, which was a scheme to impregnate her 14-year-old adopted daughter in order that she might have the fourth child she longed for.

The young girl was surprised at the mother’s request but was grateful that she had been adopted and believed that her mother would “love her more” if she acceded to her request.

With sperm purchased by her mother from Cryos international in Denmark, the 14-year-old began injecting herself, with no immediate success and one miscarriage. Finally, at the age of 17 the young girl became pregnant and gave birth to a baby boy at a local hospital.

It was there that midwives noticed that the new mother’s mother was unusually rude and demanding  with her daughter, at one point telling her that she could not breastfeed the child as she did not want any “bonding” to occur.

Overhearing this statement, the hospital contacted child protection authorities who interviewed the new mom and removed her, her baby and her siblings from her mother’s home.

The investigation also revealed that the British woman had administered douches containing vinegar and either lemon or lime juice to her daughter, because she believed this would ensure that the new baby was a girl.

The woman had isolated the children, home-schooling them and disallowing her former husband from having contact with them. Apparently, the authorities had been alerted to the unusual circumstances, but on four separate occasions determined there were no child protection issues.

In his judgment, Judge Peter Jackson described the mother as having “an exceptionally forceful personality,” and expressed “an abiding sense of disbelief that a parent could behave in such a wicked and selfish way towards a vulnerable child.”

The woman was sentenced to a five-year prison term.

After the case became public, questions were raised about the ease in which the woman was able to purchase sperm, a matter that was also noted by the judge who said, “there [are] no effective checks on a person’s ability to obtain sperm from Cryos.”

Lawdiva aka Georgialee Lang

Watch What You Say Online or Be Sued

A  divorce  lawyer in Florida was awarded $350,000 in punitive damages for false statements made by a former client who was unhappy with the services she received from her lawyer.

Both the client and her ex-husband  posted comments on multiple websites which read:

“This lawyer represented me in my divorce. She was combative and explosive and took my divorce to a level of anger which caused major suffering of my minor children. She insisted I was an emotionally abused wife who couldn’t make rational decisions which caused my case to drag on in the system for a year and a half so her FEES would continue to multiply!! She misrepresented her fees with regards to the contract I initially signed. The contract she submitted to the courts for her fees were 4 times her original quote and pages of the original had been exchanged to support her claims, only the signature page was the same. Shame on me that I did not have an original copy, but like an idiot . . . I trusted my lawyer. Don’t mistake sincerity for honesty because I assure you, that in this attorney’s case, they are NOT the same thing. She absolutely perpetuates the horrible image of attorneys who are only out for the money and themselves. Although I know this isn’t the case and there are some very good honest lawyers out there, Mrs. G.  is simply not one of the “good ones. Horrible horrible experience. Use anyone else, it would have to be a better result.”

“I accepted an initial VERY fair offer from my ex. Mrs. G. convinced me to “crush” him and that I could have permanent etc. Spent over a year (and 4 times her original estimate) to arrive at the same place we started at. Caused unnecessary chaos and fear with my kids, convinced me that my ex cheated (which he didn’t), that he was hiding money (which he wasn’t), and was mad at ME when I realized her fee circus had gone on long enough and finally said “stop”.  Altered her fee structures, actually replaced original documents with others to support her charges and generally gave the kind of poor service you only hear about. I’m not a disgruntled ex-wife. I’m just the foolish person who believes that a person’s word should be backed by integrity. Not even remotely true in this case. I’ve had 2 prior attorneys and never ever have I seen ego and monies be so blatantly out of control.”

Both the client and her ex-husband appealed the damage award, however, just before the appeal was to be heard the ex-husband withdrew his appeal saying that he had settled the matter with the attorney.

 

His ex-wife however, did not abandon her appeal and the appellate court remarked that even if she had, they would not have dismissed the appeal, because it raised an important issue with respect to free speech protections vis a vis reviews of professional services posted on the internet. The court said the issue merited discussion as it presented a scenario that would likely occur again.

At trial, both defendants admitted they had posted the online reviews. The evidence at trial included a written retainer agreement signed by the attorney’s client which proved that the lawyer had not charged her four times more than what was quoted in the agreement, a fact both defendants later admitted.

If a statement is true it will not be defamatory, but in this case the alleged overcharging was a falsehood. It simply wasn’t true. The appeal court rejected the defendant’s suggestion that their rights of free speech protected them from voicing their “opinion” online.

 

The court disagreed saying:

“An action for libel will lie for a ‘false and unprivileged publication by letter, or otherwise, which exposes a person to distrust, hatred, contempt, ridicule or obloquy or which causes such person to be avoided, or which has a tendency to injure such person in [their] office, occupation,  or business….”

 

The lesson here is to think twice before you publicly criticize a service provider, but if you feel compelled to do so, you better be sure you can prove your comments are true.

Lawdiva aka Georgialee

 

 

The Mysterious Phenomenon of Human Chimeras

GeorgiaLeeLang016Perhaps one of the most shocking parental discoveries is when a father finds out that contrary to what he has been told and believed, he is not the biological parent of a child he is raising. Many devastated fathers have terminated their spousal relationships unable to cope with such fundamental deceit.

Recently a father in Washington State was flummoxed when he learned he had no biological connection with his infant son. Since he and his wife had undergone in vitro fertilization he immediately contacted the fertility clinic to let them know of their gross error: they must have mixed up his sperm with another client. When the clinic denied the allegation, the couple went to Dr. Barry Starr, a geneticist at California’s Stanford University.

Dr. Starr’s testing determined that while he was not the child’s father, he was the child’s uncle. More confused than ever, he listened as the doctor described a rare genetic phenomenon know as chimerism. Most people have two sets of DNA, one from their father and the other from their mother. However, human chimeras have extra DNA, typically from an unborn twin, called a “vanishing twin”, whose DNA they absorbed in their mother’s womb.There are also cases where extra DNA is absorbed as a result of a blood transfusion or organ transplant.

The adoption of the name “chimeras” derives from Greek mythology, where the chimera was a monstrous fire-breathing hybrid creature composed of the parts of more than one animal. It was usually depicted as a lion, with the head of a goat arising from its back, and a tail that might end with a snake’s head.

Reported cases of chimerism are rare as many people are not aware of this anomaly, however, Lydia Fairchild almost lost her two children when she was required to take a blood test as part of her application for public assistance. The DNA test confirmed the children’s biological father, but revealed she had no biological connection with the children. She was accused of illegal surrogacy and welfare fraud.

Fortunately, around the time of the criminal investigation, an article appeared in the New England Journal of Medicine describing the case of another chimeric woman, named Karen Keegan. When Karen’s doctor suggested her three sons be tested to determine if one of them could donate a kidney to her, she learned she was not the children’s biological mother, despite carrying them to term and giving birth to them.

Ms. Fairchild’s lawyer arranged additional screening for his client and it was determined that Ms. Fairchild was a tetragametic chimera, meaning she carried two strands of DNA, the result of two sperm implanting with two eggs.

There is no question that the human body is “fearfully and wonderfully” made with all its complexities, including the mysterious phenomenon of vanishing twins.

Lawdiva aka Georgialee Lang

Is Transgenderism a Fad?

GeorgiaLeeLang100The media circus surrounding Caitlyn Jenner (aka Bruce Jenner) has introduced transsexualism and transgenderism to a public that has been largely unaware of the nuances of these forms of gender dysphoria.

I can’t remember a time when there was such open discourse about gender identity and with this transparency comes articles, movies, TV shows, and public policy discussions.

A recent article in Britain’s Daily Mail describes an American family with two children, a girl and a boy, each of whom had researched transgenderism on the internet. Their youngest daughter who appeared to be a happy teen, albeit a tomboy, was the first to advise her parents she was transgendered and wished to transition to a male. Meanwhile, her older brother, who was bullied at school for his feminine manners and appearance came out to his parents one month later.

Both mom and dad unconditionally support their teenagers’ decisions, and surgery and hormonal treatments are underway for both, in fact, their mother wishes they had come out sooner so they each could have avoided the consequences of puberty, which complicates their gender switch.

Is this gender phenomenon on the uprise? That’s hard to say because research in this area is scant, however, if newspaper articles, daytime talk shows, the implementation of legislation in various jurisdictions to protect transgendered persons, and the development of children’s gender clinics is a sign, then the answer is “yes”.

Dr. Alice Dreger, a well-regarded American bioethicist, whose research includes intersex and sex development disorders, is not afraid to challenge the politics of gender dysphoria, while supporting social justice issues that effect this community. She opines that gender identity issues may be a symptom of other family problems.

“The dirty little secret is that many of these families have big dysfunctional issues. When you get the clinicians over a beer, they’ll tell you the truth. A lot of the parents aren’t well in terms of their mental health. They think that once the child transitions, all their problems will magically go away, but that’s not really where the stress is located.”

Experts and clinicians won’t say these things publicly, she says, because they don’t want to sound as if they’re blaming gender problems on screwed-up families.

Likewise, Dr. Joseph Berger, a consulting psychiatrist in Toronto, who is past Chairman of the Toronto district of the Ontario Medical Association, and past President of the Ontario branch of the American Psychiatric Association, believes that people who identify as transgendered are mentally ill or simply unhappy. He says that what they need is treatment for delusions, psychosis, or emotional problems, not surgery and hormones.

What is irrefutable from the research are the scores of transgendered persons who have attempted suicide, although linking suicide attempts to mental illness is problematic given the challenges faced by transgendered persons including discrimination in housing and the workplace, loss of family, homelessness, poverty, and other significant social factors.

What about sex-change regret? Numerous articles and websites discuss this issue and lawsuits against surgeons have been launched around the world, particularly in Australia. But who better to speak to regret than Rene Richards, the tennis icon who transitioned in the 1970’s:

“If there was a drug that I could have taken that would have reduced the pressure, I would have been better off staying the way I was—a totally intact person. I know deep down that I’m a second-class woman. I get a lot of inquiries from would-be transsexuals, but I don’t want anyone to hold me out as an example to follow. Today there are better choices, including medication, for dealing with the compulsion to cross dress and the depression that comes from gender confusion. As far as being fulfilled as a woman, I’m not as fulfilled as I dreamed of being. I get a lot of letters from people who are considering having this operation…and I discourage them all.” —Rene Richards, “The Liaison Legacy,” Tennis Magazine, March 1999.

Lawdiva aka Georgialee Lang