There’s a Sucker Born Every Minute

GEO#1PT Barnum of circus fame is credited with saying “There’s a sucker born every minute”, and that’s just what hucksters and fraud artists count on.

Here’s the email I received today…

“I hope you get this email on time, I made a trip to (Philippines) and had my bag stolen from me with my passport and credit cards in it. Went to the embassy and they are willing to help me by issued me a temporary passport but i have to pay for a ticket and settle my hotel bills with the Manager here. Unfortunately for me, I can’t have access to funds without my credit card, i was wondering if you could loan me some few $ through western union money transfer easy for me to cash here and pay bills and get back home, I will definitely refund it back to you as soon as i get back safely.

let me know so I can forward you the details to wire it to me. Susan”

Oh, yes, I think I’ll contact Western Union right now!

I also recently received an email from a woman in Japan who wanted to retain me to assist her to collect a large sum of money from her ex-husband who happened to live in Vancouver. She asked me to begin by writing to her ex to determine if he would pay the sum he owed voluntarily or whether it would be necessary to commence a court action.

From the get-go it smelled like a scam, so in return I sent her an email advising her that in British Columbia we have “know your client” rules which require that she provide picture ID to show who she was.

Not a problem. Within a day I received a copy of a passport and an official ID card in her name with a photo of her. Her emails were all unfailing polite and to a less suspicious individual she appeared to be an ideal client as she informed me that upon my successful collection of the monies owed I would be paid my legal fees in a generous amount.

At this point her scam was no longer amusing to me and I ended the email conversation. She contacted me several times thereafter wondering why her Vancouver lawyer had not been in touch.

Had I carried on with her she would have excitedly told me that my letter had served its intended purpose and that I should expect to receive a large cheque from her ex and would I kindly deposit it to my trust account and send her my trust cheque for the monies, less my generous fee.

Had I complied, she would have received her money from my account and I would be left owing my bank a large sum of money once it became obvious that the deposited cheque was worthless. The financial consequences to me would pale in comparison to the humiliation of being so thoroughly scammed.

This scenario is just one of the hundreds of internet swindles floating through cyberspace.

Have you heard of the “grandma” scam where a young adult posing as your grandchild, obtains enough information from Facebook and other social sites to pepper her email solicitation with accurate family information. She is in trouble and needs money to either get out of jail or purchase an airline ticket to fly home to escape a dangerous situation.

The “Nigerian” scam is so old it is truly surprising that it still nets internet crooks millions of dollars a year. If you could only send money to this Nigerian diplomat, he could obtain millions of dollars that belong to his family and share it with you!

The FBI reports that between 2000 and 2009 internet fraud accounted for $1.7 billion in financial losses to unsuspecting consumers. The best way to avoid being the victim of internet fraud is to assume that every email overture concerning money involves a criminal looking for a victim. Don’t let it be you.

Lawdiva aka Georgialee Lang

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One thought on “There’s a Sucker Born Every Minute

  1. As a part time travel agent, I get several requests each day to supply airlines tickets for some person to and from several overseas airports. Often these tickets are to/from Dubai or somewhere in Africa. They ask if I take credit cards. (What kind of question is that? How else could they possibly pay?!) Always they want the tickets for tomorrow or within a week. The ironic thing is that could easily book themselves off my website. Often they claim to be a pastor.

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