Law Firm Murder Mystery

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in his first Sherlock Holmes novel “A Study in Scarlet”, published in 1887, referred to the complicating twists and turns in his story with the phrase “the plot thickens”.

This expression is apropos the mystery surrounding the deaths and other assorted skullduggery involving the well-respected law firm of Boggs, Boggs and Bates, a personal injury and insurance defence firm in St. Louis Missouri.

It began on December 17, 2006 with a gun shot to the head of firm partner Ernest Brasier, 57, who was found by a janitor under a desk in his colleague’s office. Initially the authorities believed he had succumbed to a heart attack. Later in the medical examiner’s office a small bullet hole was found in the side of his head. He had been murdered.

There was plenty of suspicion but no viable suspects. The investigation petered out only to be revived when in 2007 and 2008 two other middle-aged lawyers from the firm also died. Eventually their deaths were attributed to heart disease, but angst and speculation did not subside.

In April 2008 the firm regrouped when name partner Mark Bates left the firm. The 26 lawyer firm continued to be run by Beth Boggs and her husband Thomas Boggs. Ms. Boggs, a leading Missouri lawyer, was said to rule the firm with an iron fist.

In the early morning hours of September 30, 2010, two pipe bombs exploded at the Boggs’ home resulting in a small fire and a bedroom window shattered by shrapnel. Police and agents from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, armed with search warrants, descended on the home of former firm partner, Mark Bates. Investigators later learned that the home of the Boggs had also been burglarized recently.

Police are closed mouth about the ongoing investigation.

Only John Grisham could create such a bizarre plot, but this is real life.

Lawdiva aka Georgialee Lang

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