Divorce and Double-Dipping

A common complaint from ex-spouses who are obliged to pay spousal support is that all too often, the supported spouse gets a double-dip, and I don’t mean an ice cream cone.

Double-dipping occurs when a payor spouse pays support based on his employment income, but also pays support on his investment, rental or capital gains income arising from assets that were divided between the spouses, or for which the supported spouse received compensation through the receipt of cash or the retention of the family home.

Let me give you an example. If a husband retains a rental property valued at $100,000 and an investment portfolio worth $200,000 and in return the wife receives the former matrimonial home with a basement suite, valued at $300,000, it seems unfair for her husband to include these additional income sources as income for the purpose of paying spousal support. Yes, he may earn income on his share of the family property, but the wife also has that option.

As well, consider that the wife’s home has a basement suite she declines to rent and therefore eliminates an additional source of income for herself.

On top of all that, keep in mind that for Canadians, the matrimonial home is a tax-free asset, while the husband’s rental property will attract capital gains tax as will the investment portfolio.

Do our courts care? Nope. But lawmakers in California are addressing this issue. Bill SB 481 has been tabled in California’s Senate with the goal of passing legislation that would give judges the discretion to consider the sources of income utilized for a support calculation to prevent unfair, blatant double-dipping.

Another common example of this practice is where a business is valued by capitalizing the business’ income stream and the wife is compensated for her interest, while the husband is ordered to pay support on that same income stream.

The treatment of this issue by North American courts is divergent to say the least. In Mississippi the courts have declared double-dipping a “glaring inequity” while in other jurisdictions there is passive tolerance with no apparent will to resolve the unfairness that can occur.

Of course, cynics will say that because double-dipping most frequently prejudices husbands, not wives, it will be a long time until our courts get around to fixing the problem.

California is on the right track with their double-dipping bill. Perhaps it will catch on in other jurisdictions. Let’s hope so. Fair means fair for everyone.

Lawdiva aka Georgialee Lang

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3 thoughts on “Divorce and Double-Dipping

  1. An uncontested divorce is one where both parties agree to divorce and its settlement terms without going to trial. Divorce can be an emotional and difficult time for everyone involved, even if both spouses are in agreement about ending their marriage. An uncontested divorce may or may not be amicable; usually there are some disagreements or arguments, especially regarding sensitive issues such as child custody and support or division of property. The advantages of a no-contest divorce is that by not going to trial, you will save both time and money as uncontested divorces tend to move more quickly through the legal system. Uncontested divorces involve both parties working out any disputes without the help of a court.

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